DSH - Patton: Internships - Training Committee

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"Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open, and rules are flexible- the kind of atmosphere that is found in a nurturing family"
--Virginia Satir

 

The DSH-Patton Training Committee is composed of the Training Director, Chief of Psychology, and supervisors from the internship, fellowship, and practicum programs. The Training committee also includes all seminar leaders for the three training programs. 

This committee meets on a monthly basis to discuss issues related to psychology training at Patton.  Although the training committee members provide the bulk of the supervision in the three training programs, several other supervisors from the Department of Psychology provide additional supervision.  Trainees at all levels are exposed to multiple supervisors each training year. The professional biographies listed below give a brief description of some of the interests of the Training Committee members and some of our more regular additional supervisors.  Additionally, each supervisor below provided a few sentences about her or his approach to supervision.

William Britt, Ph.D., ABN

Biography:

Dr. Britt received his doctorate from Rosemead School of Psychology, Biola University. Dr. Britt provides neuropsychological assessment of patients with brain dysfunction and is part of the neuropsychology consultation service at DSH - Patton. He has also worked in the Department of Psychiatry at Loma Linda University School of Medicine since 1981. His interests are in neuropsychological assessment and cognitive rehabilitation. Disorders of interest include brain trauma, temporary and progressive dementias, vascular insults, seizure disorders, neurotoxin exposures, tumors, and brain abscesses/infections in children and adults. Dr. Britt was involved in a five-year NIH funded study of Alzheimer’s Disease at Loma Linda University. He obtained his Diplomate from the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology in 2000 and has supervised and taught many psychology interns, fellows, and psychiatric residents over the past 30 years.

Approach to Supervision:

“I have supervised interns for at least 20 years. I enjoy helping interns integrate their education and training in this final year so that they leave the internship with a holistic sense of what a psychologist does.”

Robert Brodie, Ph.D. Robert Brodie, Ph.D.

Biography:

Dr. Brodie has always had two particular educational passions, psychology and criminal law. While completing his B.A. degree at the University of California, Irvine, he majored in psychology and had a minor in criminal law. While at UC Irvine he took a course entitled the Psychology of Blacks and began to learn the foundation for what grew into the field of cross-cultural psychology. He attended the University of California, Santa Barbara because its doctoral program specialized in issues of multiculturalism and cultural competence. Dr. Brodie completed his clinical internship in the Forensic Track at DSH - Patton. The following year, he completed the postdoctoral fellowship in Forensic Psychology DSH - Patton. Currently, Dr. Brodie is a Senior Psychologist Supervisor at Patton, where his clinical work allows him to complete forensic assessments, conduct individual and group therapy, and participate in the supervision and training of our clinical trainees and Staff Psychologists. In addition to his work at Patton, Dr. Brodie has been an adjunct instructor at the University of La Verne and holds a private clinical practice providing assessment, treatment, and consultation and specialize in providing culturally responsive services and interventions.

Approach to Supervision:

“Clinical supervision is a process that is adjusted depending on the needs of the supervisee and the type of treatment that is being provided. I thoroughly enjoy the process of supervision and hope that the supervisee will also. I look to challenge the supervisee to push the limit and try different techniques in their work. My theoretical orientation is cognitive-behavioral but I am eclectic in technique. Internship is a year to develop a professional identity and I hope to assist in that process. Remember two things, recognize when you are working harder than your client and enjoy the work that you do.”

Elba Campos, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Campos received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Forensic Family work, from the California School of Professional Psychology in San Francisco. She completed her internship at Patton State Hospital with an emphasis in Forensic and Multicultural treatment and assessment. The following year, Dr. Campos completed a one year post-doctoral fellowship in Forensic Psychology, also at Patton State Hospital, after which she was hired as a unit psychologist.  Dr. Campos currently works on one of Patton State Hospital’s specialized units, providing treatment and assessment to monolingual Spanish speaking individuals with short-term and long-term legal commitments. Dr. Campos enjoys applying brief-dynamic as well as cognitive-behavioral concepts of behavior change in the assessment and treatment of individuals suffering from severe mental disorders. She has participated in the supervision and training of clerks and interns, as well as running the professional development seminar for fellows and unlicensed psychologists at PSH. She is fluent in Spanish and is able to provide supervision for Spanish-language cases. In addition to her work at Patton, Dr. Campos holds a forensic private practice providing assessment and consultation for extradition, political asylum, and fitness for duty cases. In her spare time, Dr. Campos enjoys everything soccer – from playing in a local recreational league to supporting her favorite teams, and making a point to attend the FIFA World Cup every four years.

Approach to Supervision:

“I believe in a structured and collaborative approach to Supervision. As an assessment supervisor I strongly believe in empirically validated interpretation founded in current research.  I also believe that we need to use our clinical skills to enrich empirically derived findings, and hope to help trainees further develop this skill set in writing and interpreting forensic assessment.  One of my supervision goals is to work with trainees in providing multidimensional and practical “every day” recommendations to the individuals being assessed and their multidisciplinary treatment teams. Overall, I thoroughly enjoy being able to provide supervision and am always looking forward to meeting new people with varying backgrounds, personal experiences, and professional foundations.”

Sheri Curtis, Ph.D. Sheri Curtis, Ph.D.

Biography:

Dr. Curtis received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Loma Linda University in 2004. She completed her internship and postdoctoral fellowship in clinical psychology at DSH - Patton. Dr. Curtis has received advanced training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Gestalt Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy. She has published in the areas of codependency and victim blame and her current research interest is in attachment theory, measurement, and clinical applications. Currently, Dr. Curtis is a Senior Psychologist Supervisor at Patton. In this capacity, she provides clinical supervision for 10 psychologists. Dr. Curtis has a strong interest in different psychological treatment modalities including DBT and is currently on the statewide DBT implementation committee for the California Department of State Hospitals. She has been a Coordinating Supervisor within the Patton internship for several years. In addition to her work at Patton, Dr. Curtis maintains a private practice in the community.

Approach to Supervision:

“Being a supervisor is a rewarding experience. On a professional level, it is stimulating because there is an element of seriousness to the process as well as an element of creativity. With supervisees, I encourage discussing the important topics of ethics, research findings, evidenced based practice, professional growth and adjustment, and case conceptualization. On a personal level, I consider the opportunity to work with interns as they transition to their professional roles a profound privilege.”

Sean Evans, Ph.D. Sean Evans

Biography:

Dr. Evans received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Loma Linda University with concentrations in neuropsychology and pediatric psychology (his master’s thesis and dissertation were on the experience of pain in chronically ill children) and completed his internship in the Clinical Neuropsychology Track at Patton State Hospital. During this year of training, Dr. Evans completed a rotation conducting forensic evaluations (violence risk assessments, malingering and competency assessments) that resulted in changing his professional path from neuropsychology to clinical forensic psychology. While at Patton State Hospital, Dr. Evans has served as an admission psychologist on an all-female unit, behavioral consultant, Senior Psychologist Supervisor, and a Risk Management Specialist focusing on research, evaluation, and the reduction of institutional violence.  He is currently a statewide data analyst and senior researcher for the California Department of State Hospitals and is based at DSH-Patton. In this capacity, he assists with research and quality improvement projects aimed at reducing/preventing violent behaviors and improving patient care. Abstracts of his research projects can be found on his ResearchGate profile. Dr. Evans holds an academic appointment as an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program at La Sierra University. Dr. Evans is also an avid fan of Pearl Jam, U2, Soundgarden, and the Seattle Seahawks.

Approach to Supervision:

“One of the guiding principles in my professional and personal life is embodied in the Socratic statement: ‘The unexamined life is not worth living.’ I think supervision reflects one of those rare opportunities in our development as clinicians to deepen our understanding of the human experience, through dialogue and collaboration, in which we examine ourselves and the individuals we serve. I prefer using a hypothesis testing model, in which initial ideas are discussed, hypothesized, and then tested against the empirical data derived from testing and observation. Being mindful of how we examine not only our own human experience, but also how we impact the experience of others, engenders more understanding and a life that is truly worthy of human existence.”

Troy Freimuth, Psy.D.

Biography:

Prior to attending graduate school, Dr. Freimuth spent two years as a behavioral specialist designing learning and behavioral management programs for children with autism. He then attended graduate school at Indiana State University focusing his studies in the areas of substance abuse treatment, motivational interviewing, and cognitive/constructivist therapies. He completed an internship at the University of Wisconsin-Madison counseling center and graduated with his Psy.D. in 2002. Before joining the staff at DSH - Patton, Dr. Freimuth worked in a maximum security youth prison, a medical hospital for Native Americans, and spent several years in private practice providing individual, family, and group therapy as well as conducting assessments for local agencies and the courts. During this time, he received specialized training in DBT, motivational interviewing, crisis counseling, Gottman’s couples therapy, therapy with children, and transcendental meditation. At DSH - Patton, Dr. Freimuth has worked on units treating and assessing individuals who are incompetent to stand trial as well as individuals who were found not guilty by reason of insanity, mentally disordered offenders, and individuals who are civilly committed on a conservatorship. Currently, Dr. Freimuth oversees all substance abuse treatment at Patton State Hospital. Dr. Freimuth is one of the facilitators of the psychotherapy seminar. In his personal life, Dr. Freimuth is an avid fan and practitioner of mixed martial arts, soccer, basketball, poker, and videogames.

Approach to Supervision:

“I use a developmental supervisorial model tailoring supervision to the progress and needs of the supervisee gradually moving from more didactic instruction and close supervision to more of a consultative role as the year progresses. I stress the importance of ‘relationship’ as being the fundamental building block in all aspects of clinical practice including the supervisory relationship, therapy relationships, assessment relationships, collegial relationships, and consulting relationships. I conceptualize in an integrative framework primarily drawing upon behavioral, constructive, narrative, and emotion focused perspectives along with some incorporation of psychodynamic theory. I believe strongly that therapy has elements of both science and art/craft and encourages supervisees to always be aware of the empirical support for the interventions that they are utilizing. Further, he stresses how the lens (theory/theories) we use both aid and constrict us in understanding the unique individual that we are interacting with.”

David Glassmire, Ph.D., ABPP David Glassmire

Biography:

Dr. Glassmire received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and completed his internship in the Clinical Neuropsychology Track at DSH - Patton. The following year, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship in forensic psychology with an additional emphasis in clinical neuropsychology at Patton. Dr. Glassmire was formerly the psychologist in Patton’s Substance Abuse and Mental Illness program and was later a psychological assessment consultant on a program for patients adjudicated as incompetent to stand trial. He has been the Internship Director at Patton since 2006 and currently directs all three training programs. In addition to serving as Patton’s Training Director, Dr. Glassmire maintains a part-time private practice providing treatment and forensic assessments. Dr. Glassmire enjoys teaching and was formerly a part-time faculty member in the Department of Gerontology at the University of Southern California teaching both graduate and undergraduate classes for six years.  Dr. Glassmire is actively involved in research on the MMPI-2-RF, trial competency assessment, and the assessment of malingering. Abstracts of his research projects can be found on his ResearchGate profile. For about 10 years, Dr. Glassmire served as a Consulting Editor for the Journal of Personality Assessment in the areas of MMPI-2 and cross-cultural assessment. Dr. Glassmire is a Diplomate in Forensic Psychology with the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). In his spare time, Dr. Glassmire enjoys distance running and watching movies, particularly those that display the breadth of the “human experience” and have a quirky nature.

Approach to Supervision:

“I find that providing supervision to interns is the most rewarding part of my job because it keeps me in touch with the professional development process of future psychologists. I think of supervision as a collaborative process in which we work together to understand the individuals we serve at the hospital. Although I provide my initial hypotheses about cases during supervision sessions, I also try to challenge supervisees to articulate the rationale underlying their own hypotheses about the case in question.”

Kerry Hannifin, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Hannifin received her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Family Systems from Azusa Pacific University in 2008. She completed an internship at The Guidance Center in Long Beach. As part of her internship training she completed specialty rotations in neuropsychology at Jonathan Jaques Children’s Cancer Center at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center and in child/adolescent trauma and abuse at the federally funded MCAVIC-USC Child and Adolescent Trauma Center in Long Beach. Dr. Hannifin also received one year of formal Dialectical Behavior Treatment (DBT) training at Harbor UCLA. Dr. Hannifin was hired as a staff psychologist at DSH-Patton in 2008 and has spent the majority of her career at DSH-Patton working on an acute admissions, all male, multi-commitment unit. She has supervised practicum students in the role of primary supervisor as well as by serving as a presenter for the case seminar where she provided presentations on working with Borderline Personality Disorder in a forensic inpatient setting. Dr. Hannifin is the professional development seminar supervisor for the Post-Doctoral fellows.

Approach to Supervision:

“As a supervisor, my goal is to help each trainee grow into an autonomous, self-confident professional. I like to create a supervision environment that trainee’s feel comfortable sharing not only individual case questions but professional growth questions. My approach to supervision is one that is collaborative as I believe this approach allows trainees the opportunity to develop stronger case conceptualization skills and a sense of professionalism. I find working with the trainee’s in one capacity or another is one of the most fulfilling and rewarding aspects of my role as a psychologist.”

Melissa Jajko, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Jajko received her doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology in 2013 from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology in Chicago, Illinois. As a graduate student, her academic concentration was in forensic psychology and she worked in numerous correctional and forensic settings, including Cook County Jail and the Illinois Department of Corrections- Juvenile Division. Her dissertation research was with juvenile sex offenders. Dr. Jajko completed her internship at Department of State Hospitals- Vacaville and was then hired as a Staff Psychologist at PSH.

Approach to Supervision:

“As an early career psychologist, my approach to supervision continues to evolve and grow. I believe that supervision is parallel to a mentorship, and we both can learn from the process. I typically implement and utilize a strengths-based approach to supervision where I focus on strengths and successes while also helping the trainee gain awareness into the challenges they face in this field. I provide guidance, while also allowing autonomy and empowering them to commit to their values and to step outside their comfort zone. I believe that communication openness is always important in the supervisory relationship and that change is a collaborative, ongoing process.”

Ryan Jordan, Ph.D.

Biography:

Dr. Jordan received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Alliant International University-San Diego in 2012. He completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship (hybrid clinical-forensic) through the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Twin Towers Correctional Facility in 2013. Prior to this, he completed an APA-accredited internship at DSH-Metropolitan, as well as various practicums throughout San Diego County, including the UCSD Medical Center, Moore’s Cancer Center and Pain Clinic, and Aurora Behavioral Healthcare. Dr. Jordan has been a staff psychologist at DSH-Patton since 2015, during which time he has been providing assessment and treatment services on a long-term, all female specialty unit as part of a multidisciplinary treatment team. In addition, Dr. Jordan operates a private clinical-forensic psychology practice in Orange County, specializing in assessment and treatment of criminal offenders and where he serves on multiple Mental Health Evaluator Panels and is CASOMB-certified to provide services to sexual offenders. Prior to coming to DSH-Patton, Dr. Jordan taught multiple courses at California State University-Long Beach, including Abnormal Psychology, Addictions, and Human Sexuality. Dr. Jordan has multiple areas of clinical interest, including Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), psychological assessment, sexual deviancy, forensic commitment issues, and violence risk assessment. With regards to ongoing research, Dr. Jordan is involved with various projects concerning different offender populations, sexual deviancy, personality assessment, and the Rorschach.

Approach to Supervision:

“Put in the simplest terms, my approach to supervision is to create a strong relationship, impart knowledge, facilitate growth and positive change, and ensure students are prepared for the challenges they are certain to face in their careers.”

 

Allen Kilian, Ph.D.Allen Killian

Biography:

Dr. Kilian received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2003 from Fuller Graduate School of Psychology and completed his internship in the Forensic Track at DSH - Patton. He was subsequently hired as a Staff Psychologist at Patton. Dr. Kilian spent his first 9 years as a Staff Psychologist serving patients on an acute admissions unit who have been deemed by the court to be incompetent to stand trial. His work on this unit emphasized assessment based treatment with particular emphasis on forensic questions including competence to proceed as well as questions of effort and exaggeration. In June of 2011, Dr. Kilian functioned with the Psychology Assessment Service as a hospital-wide assessment consultant assisting treatment teams to answer clinical as well as forensic questions. During the training years of 2014-2015 & 2015-2016, Dr. Kilian served as the director of the Practicum training program at DSH-Patton where he and a number of staff psychologists mentored and trained pre doctoral level students. Dr. Kilian has also functioned as adjunct instructor for graduate programs in the vicinity and has maintained a private practice for over a decade within both criminal and civil arenas. Dr. Kilian’s research interests have included assessment, neuropsychological sequelae of psychotic spectrum illnesses, and community based treatment for those with severe and chronic mental illness.

Approach to Supervision:

“I have experienced the supervisory relationship to be one of the most valuable professional relationships in my career. I aspire to make it similarly valuable to every trainee I supervise. I encourage my trainees to become assertive and to take responsibility for what they know and what they do not know and who they are becoming as professionals. This process can be difficult because trainees are typically very preoccupied with training they have not had and all the many things they have yet to achieve. Supervision is at its best when it provides space for a trainee to begin trusting her/his training. I believe, as a consequence, my interns have been freed to experience relationships with patients, the science of assessment and treatment, and learning as a process as opposed to any singular event.”

Victoria King Palenscar, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. King Palenscar earned her M.A. in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in marriage and family therapy at Pepperdine University in 2004 and later graduated from Pepperdine with her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2007. She completed an internship at DSH - Patton in the Forensic Track and was subsequently hired as a staff psychologist at DSH - Patton. Initially she worked as a unit psychologist on a long-term medically fragile unit and later transferred to an all-female acute admissions unit. She also previously currently serves as a hospital-wide assessment consultant.

Approach to Supervision:

“I have found supervising to be one of the most rewarding aspects of my experience working at DSH - Patton. I enjoy assisting students in their transition from trainees to professionals. As a supervisor I believe it is my role to provide a supportive environment for student to openly share their experiences, concerns and successes. I meet students where they are and as the year progresses encourage more independence. At the same time I remain available to provide as much information and assistance as needed.”

Dominique Kinney, Ph.D. name

Biography:

Dr. Kinney received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Pacific Graduate School of Psychology with an emphasis in Neuropsychology. She went on to complete her internship in the Clinical Neuropsychology Track at DSH - Patton State Hospital. Currently, she is a member of DSH - Patton’s Neuropsychology Consultation Service. She is a primary supervisor for the Neuropsychology Intern and she is the Co-Director of the Neuropsychology Post-Doctoral Fellowship. She is particularly interested in the neurocognitive correlates of psychiatric illness and the complexities that arise from providing neuropsychological services to dually-diagnosed individuals. Her areas of clinical and research interest are in psychiatric neuropsychology, cross-cultural psychology, and positive psychology. In her free time she enjoys the sense of fulfillment she receives from the “vital engagement” of family life.

Approach to Supervision:

“Supervision at the intern level is an opportunity to assist the supervisee in shedding the student persona and helping the intern to develop into the type of professional he or she hopes to become. Whether working with patients or supervisees, it is my perspective that bolstering the weaknesses in others does not equal promoting the best in others. Therefore, I hope to provide a training environment that identifies, fosters, and supports an intern’s professional gifts and talents.”

Robert Koranda, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Koranda received his Psy.D. in Clinical/Community Psychology from the University of La Verne in 2007. Prior to receiving his degree, he completed a practicum placement at DSH-Patton, and then he completed his internship through the Bureau of Prisons at the Federal Medical Center in Butner, North Carolina with an emphasis on Forensic Assessment. He returned in DSH-Patton in 2007 as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Forensic Psychology. At the completion of this fellowship year in 2008, he was hired as a staff psychologist and he presently works on one of the long-term male units. During that time, he has supervised various cases within all of the training programs.

Approach to Supervision:

“My goal for supervision is to build a safe and collaborative environment for my students, where they can feel comfortable to consult with me on any clinical or professional issue. I strive to build upon their strengths, while simultaneously guiding them in different areas that may need additional attention.”

Alexandra Linscott, Ph.D.

Biography:

Dr. Linscott received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2010 from Fuller Graduate School of Psychology and completed her internship in the Clinical Track at DSH - Patton. She was subsequently hired as a Staff Psychologist at Patton. Dr. Linscott previously worked on a long term unit serving patients found not guilty by reason of insanity, before moving on to an admissions unit for patients deemed by the court to be incompetent to stand trial. Currently, Dr. Linscott is a hospital-wide assessment consultant.  In addition to her work at Patton, she maintains a private practice conducting forensic and immigration assessments as well as psychotherapy. Dr. Linscott is a native Spanish speaker and provides both assessment and psychotherapy in Spanish.

Approach to Supervision:

“Supervision offers an opportunity for enrichment on the part of both the student and the supervisor. I truly enjoy watching students grow in their competence and self-confidence, and view my role a mentor in helping the student work towards the eventual goal of more independent practice. I appreciate students who are willing to dialogue about the particular nuances of working with forensic patients at Patton, and the ethical, clinical and even philosophical challenges that come with our particular population.”

 

Ming Liu, Ph.D. Ming Liu

Biography:

Dr. Liu received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology. He has been employed at DSH - Patton as a Staff Psychologist since 1989. Initially, Dr. Liu worked on a unit that specialized in the assessment and treatment of individuals who were adjudicated as incompetent to stand trial. Following his work on a trial competency unit, Dr. Liu was the psychologist on DSH - Patton’s unit for individuals who were determined to be “psychologically fragile.” In many cases, patients were sent to this unit after being victimized by other patients in the hospital. Currently, Dr. Liu works as the psychologist on DSH - Patton’s geriatric unit, providing both treatment and assessment to older adults with a wide variety of legal commitments. In addition to working at DSH - Patton for a number of years, Dr. Liu has worked in an outpatient community mental health setting.

Approach to Supervision:

“I am psychodynamically inclined and enjoy understanding a person from various theoretical angles. I attempt to create an egalitarian working relationship with both supervisees and patients. I see working with interns as a learning experience for both parties.”

Mona Mosk, Ph.D. Mona Mosk

Biography:

Dr. Mona Mosk received a double Master’s in Clinical and Community Psychology at California State University, Northridge with a minor in Multicultural Psychology and received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1996 from the University of South Dakota. She completed her internship at the Audie L. Murphy Memorial Veteran’s Hospital in San Antonio Texas. Following completion of her undergraduate degree, Dr. Mosk initially specialized in general trauma, working consistently with sexually and physically abused children between the ages of 2 and 14 and their families. Since coming to DSH - Patton, Dr. Mosk has specialized in Deaf Psychology, working on the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Unit. This unit is the only forensic, deaf-focused unit in the State of California, providing services in American Sign Language (ASL). Dr. Mosk, who is fluent in ASL, is certified as bilingual by the State of California and can provide supervision to interns who work with - Patton’s deaf and hard-of-hearing patients.

Approach to Supervision:

“I believe that the purpose of supervision is to help interns develop their own therapeutic and conceptualization style. I find the intern’s development from “student” to “professional” over the course of a year to be both challenging and rewarding. My goal at the end of the year is to have interns be able to understand what they are doing and not doing in psychotherapy and assessment arenas and why.”

Adrianne Nelson, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Nelson completed her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) in 2014. Prior to attending FIT, she completed a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She maintained a focus in forensic psychology and working with individuals with severe mental illness throughout her practicum placements. She came to Patton as an intern during the 2013-2014 training year and completed the Forensic Track within our internship. She then completed our postdoctoral fellowship in forensic psychology in 2015. During her internship and fellowship, Dr. Nelson was involved in research on violence risk assessment. She was hired as a Staff Psychologist at the conclusion of her fellowship in 2015 and has served in the roles of Coordinating Supervisor in the practicum and Assessment Coordinator in the internship at Patton.

Approach to Supervision:

“My supervision style involves learning what the supervisee believes are his/her strengths and areas for improvement or enhancement and areas he/she would want to become more proficient. Then, we use that information as a foundation to identify the best assessment experiences that will provide great learning opportunities. Each assessment is used as a means to fine tune skills and to learn and practice new assessment skills. I envision supervision as a collaborative process that encourages the growth of the supervisee's clinical skills, knowledge, and competencies in preparation for internship and/or full time employment.”

Wendy Ng, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Ng completed her Psy.D. in Clinical-Community Psychology at the University of La Verne in 2014. She has a strong interest in forensic psychology.  During her graduate training, she completed her practicum at Tarzana Treatment Centers, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and an assessment practicum at Patton State Hospital. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital and returned to Patton State Hospital to complete her Postdoctoral Fellowship in Forensic Psychology. During her fellowship year, she was actively involved in research looking at the role of clinical judgment in malingering assessment.  Dr. Ng became a Staff Psychologist at Patton in 2015 and has been involved in the pre-doctoral, internship, and fellowship training programs since that time. 

Approach to Supervision:

“My approach to clinical supervision includes a combination of the Integrated Developmental Model and Bernard’s Discrimination Model. I believe in the need for supervisors to utilize approaches and techniques that correspond with the supervisee’ level of experience and professional development. By adopting flexible roles as a teacher, counselor, and a consultant, I can respond to the most salient needs of the supervisee in that moment.”

 

Steve Nitch, Ph.D., ABPP-CN steve nitch

Biography:

Dr. Nitch is board certified in Clinical Neuropsychology through the American Board of Professional psychology (ABPP). Dr. Nitch received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2002 from Loma Linda University, with a concentration in the area of Neuropsychology. His doctoral dissertation explored the relationship between chronic pain and non-pathological personality traits. Dr. Nitch completed an internship at the Loma Linda VA Hospital and then a Neuropsychology Fellowship at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Upon the inception of the Neuropsychology Consultation Services at DSH - Patton in 2004, he began his tenure in state service. Dr. Nitch is the Co-Director of Neuropsychology Fellowship Training at Patton. When not serving the governor, Dr. Nitch works in the outpatient Psychiatry clinic at the Loma Linda Medical Center and in an assessment private practice. His research interests include malingering and suspect effort, the differential diagnosis of dementia, adult attention-deficit disorder, and the cognitive correlates of psychosis. In addition, he maintains an active interest in studying the functional effects of psychotropic medications, having earned a Master’s Degree in Psychopharmacology (2006). When it is time for diversion, his activities of choice include distance running and watching non-strenuous sports such as baseball.

Approach to Supervision:

“Looking back upon my own experience, I believe that a good supervisor encourages the steady development of a skill set while allowing for the exploration of new areas of interest. It is all too soon that one’s training period is over and it is time to fulfill the myriad responsibilities of an independent practitioner. As such, it is my hope that the people I supervise take the time to immerse themselves in the specialty areas that interest them and soak up the rich clinical environment that DSH - Patton affords. I encourage supervisees to proactively identify the types of cases and experiences that they want to have at the outset of the training year. In supervision, I strive to provide a balance of didactics and mutually generated case conceptualization, with more independence given as the training year progresses.  

Allison Pate, Ph.D., ABPP Allison Pate

Biography:

Dr. Pate received her Master’s in Clinical Psychology from Middle Tennessee State University and in 1999 received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of North Dakota. After completing her internship in the Clinical track at DSH-Patton, she was hired and worked for five years as the sole psychologist for DSH-Patton’s only long term all-female fifty-bed unit. She then worked on an acute male admissions unit, after which she worked for two years on a co-ed wellness-focused long term care unit. In 2006, she moved to administration to assist the Psychology Chief with DOJ requirements, and in 2007 she became a Senior Psychologist Specialist. In January 2008, she was appointed Senior Psychologist Supervisor for Program I (now Program 6), and in 2013 she began sharing a caseload with another Supervising Psychologist. At present she is both a Senior Supervisor and the treating psychologist for fifteen patients on the geriatric unit. Dr. Pate has been providing supervision in Patton’s internship since 2002, and has served as a Coordinating Supervisor since 2005. She is board certified in Clinical Psychology through the American Board of Professional Psychology. She has published in the areas of personality traits, personality assessment, and crisis response, and has worked in the community at a program that treats and assesses sex offenders. In 2006, she completed a yearlong advanced training course in object relations psychoanalytic psychotherapy, and she has received advanced training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. She maintains a part-time private practice providing psychological treatment and assessment. In her spare time she has earned two black belts in tae kwon do, plays soccer, and roots for Arsenal in the English Premiership Football league.

Approach to Supervision:

“I believe that supervision provides one of the most valuable and vital sources of growth for budding psychologists, and I enjoy and feel honored to play such a role in a new professional’s development. My approach begins with identification of the needs and interests of the supervisee. Within this framework, I strive to provide a collaborative, supportive and flexible atmosphere within which the supervisee can explore theories and ideas, hone therapeutic interventions, incorporate ethical and cultural considerations, discuss professional development issues, and learn from new experiences.”

Jesus Rodriguez, Ph.D.

Biography:

Dr. Rodriguez received his Ph.D. in 2006 from the combined program in Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychology at Utah State University. He completed his pre-doctoral internship at DSH-Patton before joining the hospital as a staff member in 2006. Dr. Rodriguez has a strong interest in the theory and practice of psychotherapy. He uses an integrative approach in his work with clients, with client-centered theory providing the foundation for integrating other theoretical ideas and techniques. He also has a strong interest in ethnic minority mental health issues, with special emphasis on the relation between acculturation and mental health. Dr. Rodriguez currently works on a monolingual Spanish speaking unit where he conducts assessment and therapy in Spanish.  Dr. Rodriguez is the facilitator of the internship Professional Development Seminar.

Approach to Supervision:

“I truly enjoy working with students and helping them in them their development as psychologists. My approach to supervision is in large part determined by the student’s needs. For example, if a student would like to develop a specific assessment skill, then I may take a more directive role in supervision in an effort to help the student develop that skill. More generally, I believe in creating an atmosphere of trust and understanding from which the student can feel comfortable identifying his or her professional needs. Once these needs are identified, I work collaboratively with the student to help him or her fulfill these needs.”

Gina Sillo, Psy.D. name

Biography:

Dr. Sillo received her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology with a minor concentration in family studies from Loma Linda University. She completed her practicum at Patton State Hospital in 2006, and went on to complete her internship at the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Metropolitan Detention Center. In addition to working on a variety of research projects in the field of substance abuse, she was a project coordinator for the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Program, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery, a national clinical trial. She has also provided substance abuse treatment at the Matrix Institute for Addiction. Dr. Sillo has taught at the University of La Verne, her undergraduate alma mater, as a part-time faculty member for the Full Battery assessment course.  She currently provides forensic assessment and consultation services with an adult and juvenile population. She has enjoyed supervising students at Patton since 2008. For the past several years she has transitioned into the role of case conceptualization training supervisor, where she leads a bi-weekly seminar with practicum students Dr. Sillo has worked on a long term unit for the first several years of her position at Patton, and now she enjoys working on an admissions unit. In her spare time, Dr. Sillo enjoys cooking, watching movies, going to concerts, and camping with her family.

Approach to Supervision:

“Supervising has been among the most rewarding parts of my position at Patton. I feel very lucky to be a part of the dynamic growth experience in the lives of students in a setting such as Patton. I like to be a part of this exciting journey and find most rewards lie in watching students grow and move on to the next stage in their professional lives. My approach to supervision involves meeting students at their developmental level with a focus on helping them grow and meet their unique goals. The case conceptualization seminar is an environment that fosters not only a deepening of ones abilities to conceptualize cases, but also builds students’ abilities to consult with others on a professional level.”

Sherin Singleton, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Singleton received her Psy.D. in Clinical Community Psychology in 2009 from University of La Verne. Her doctoral dissertation evaluated the construct validity of measures of racial identity. During graduate school, she trained DSH-Patton as a practicum student before completing her internship at San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health - forensic track. She has worked at DSH-Patton since May 2011, primarily with patients found Incompetent to Stand Trial. Prior to joining DSH-Patton, she worked as a Research Specialist II with Riverside County Department of Public Social Services, where she had the opportunity to conduct numerous research and program evaluation projects. Her clinical interests are in the areas of adjudicative competence, malingering, program development, and program evaluation. She currently also has a part-time private practice providing psychological treatment, evaluation, and assessment, wherein her clinical interests include the treatment of adolescents, LGBT individuals, anxiety and mood disorders, and in civil forensic psychology.

Approach to Supervision:

“One of the most rewarding parts of my job is being involved in our training programs. I see supervision as a collaborative process between the trainee and supervisor, and driven by the needs of the trainee. Early in the training year, I find that a more structured approach is beneficial. Throughout the year, however, I enjoy watching trainees gain comfort with, and confidence in, their own skills and abilities, and their ability to make complex connections between theory and practice.”

Cathy Sink, Ph.D. Cathy Sink

Biography:

Dr. Sink received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1979 from Fuller Graduate School of Psychology. She completed her internship at Camarillo State Hospital and received a year of postdoctoral clinical training in adult outpatient psychotherapy at the Pasadena Community Counseling Clinic. She worked at the University of Alaska Fairbanks from 1980-1994 as a Staff Counselor in the Center for Health and Counseling and as an Assistant Professor of Psychology. She has worked at DSH - Patton since July 1995 and has been consistently involved in the internship program throughout her years here in various roles including Coordinating Supervisor and Supervisor Mentor.

Approach to Supervision:

"Working with interns has been one of the most rewarding aspects of my job here at DSH - Patton. It not only keeps me on my toes professionally, but also allows me the opportunity to contribute to the process by which interns move from being students to new psychologists. I see my role in supervision as providing information, support and guidance to aid in this transition." 

Kasmira Sobkow, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Sobkow earned her doctorate in Clinical-Community Psychology from University of La Verne and completed her pre-doctoral internship at Saint Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C. The following year, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in forensic psychology at DSH - Patton. Dr. Sobkow has experience with male and female long term patients adjudicated not guilty by reason of insanity, mentally disordered offenders, and the gravely disabled. She has also worked with patients deemed incompetent to stand trial, civilly committed sex offenders, and parolees. Dr. Sobkow is particularly interested in multicultural and diversity issues as they apply to both patients and mental health providers; she also has a strong interest in forensic specific assessment. Currently, Dr. Sobkow works on a long term female unit where she incorporates core tenets of Relapse Prevention, and the Good Lives and Risk, Needs, and Responsivity models into treatment and risk assessment. Away from the hospital, Dr. Sobkow enjoys anything to do with the arts (especially dance!) and refining her foodie palate.

Approach to Supervision:

“My approach to supervision is collaborative, strengths based, and developmental in nature. I believe that growth, both personally and professionally, occurs within a supportive environment where the trainee is free to discuss clinical hypotheses, develop their own therapeutic voice, and explore professional development issues. As such, I strive to foster an open learning environment where I meet trainees where they are, provide ongoing guidance and support, and encourage increased autonomy as the year progresses.”

Lauren Stevenson, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Stevenson earned her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Azusa Pacific University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Harbor UCLA Medical Center. She has been a Staff Psychologist at Patton since 2010 and has worked on an all-female treatment unit with longer term commitments. Dr. Stevenson has a strong interest in cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and has received advanced training in these modalities. Dr. Stevenson has co-facilitated the internship Psychotherapy Seminar for several years. She also has a private practice where she provides assessment and treatment services.

Elizabeth Sugleris, Ph.D.

Biography:

Dr. Sugleris received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2015 from Sam Houston State University. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Federal Medical Center- Lexington before joining the hospital as a staff member shortly after graduating in 2015. Using her forensic knowledge base acquired at SHSU combined with the thorough training in correctional and forensic psychology she received at FMC-Lexington, Dr. Sugleris currently works on a unit for males found incompetent to stand trial. While not at work Dr. Sugleris enjoys running, spinning, cuddling with her pups, and rooting for the Indianapolis Colts.

Approach to Supervision:

“As a recent intern and graduate, I remember all too well being the supervisee as much as the supervisor. For me supervision is most effective when there is open communication and a clear understanding of expectations on both sides. I encourage openness and honesty whenever possible and work hard to be create a safe environment for all supervisory issues, both work related and regarding professional development.”

Parnian Toofanian Ross, J.D., Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Ross earned her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium in 2011. Prior to beginning her career as a psychologist, she completed her law degree at the University of San Diego School of Law. During graduate school, Dr. Ross completed neuropsychological training at the VA Palo Alto Healthcare System and at the Memory and Aging Center, as well as the Epilepsy Center at the University of California, San Francisco. She then completed her internship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in the inpatient and neuropsychology rotations prior to coming to Patton in 2011 for a two-year fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology. Shortly after completing her fellowship, Dr. Ross accepted a position as a Staff Psychologist at Patton. She has been involved with the training programs in different capacities and has served as an Assessment Coordinator for interns. She has an interest in the intersection of neuropsychology and the law and has published research studies on related topics including the cognitive performance validity assessment and the ability of neuropsychological screening measures to predict whether incompetent to stand trial patients will take significantly longer than average to become competent to stand trial (thereby requiring additional up-front intervention). In addition to sharing her psychological knowledge with trainees in supervision, Dr. Ross has utilized her legal skills and has served as an attorney during the fellowship Mock Court proceedings.

Jette Warka, Ph.D. Jette Warka

Biography:

Dr. Jette Warka received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2001 from Loma Linda University. She completed her internship at DSH - Patton and started working as a staff psychologist at DSH - Patton in September 2001 after completing her internship. Dr. Warka worked as a staff psychologist on a long-term treatment unit for 5 years. The population served on the unit consists mostly of individuals found not guilty by reason of insanity and of mentally disordered offenders. In September 2006, Dr. Warka joined the hospital’s Positive Behavior Support Consultation Service where she worked as the chair of one of DSH - Patton’s Positive Behavior Support Teams. Dr. Warka then served as a Senior Psychologist Supervisor on a long term treatment unit. She is currently serving as the acting Chief of Psychology at Patton. Dr. Warka also works part-time in the community with mentally ill parolees. Dr. Warka is originally from Denmark and she was a pre-school teacher before she came to this country. Her clinical and research interests include development of personality, factors contributing to vulnerability for psychopathology, and factors contributing to resilience.

Approach to Supervision:

“My approach to supervision is to meet the intern where he or she is and go from there. Initially, I provide a lot of structure in supervision, but as the intern becomes comfortable with the individuals we serve and with our hospital, I let the intern take the lead. Supervision then becomes a collaborative process of understanding the individual and his or her current situation in terms of clinical theory, legal status, and interactions/process during sessions.”

Elena Welsh, Ph.D. name

Biography:

Dr. Welsh received her Ph.D. in Clinical and Community Psychology from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.  Following internship at Patton State Hospital, she completed a clinical postdoctoral fellowship at Gateways Hospital in Los Angeles, CA.  Dr. Welsh serves as a Staff Psychologist at DSH-Patton and co-facilitates the intern Psychotherapy seminar. She also serves as Adjunct Faculty at Antioch University Los Angeles, teaching courses in the trauma specialization, as well as general psychology courses required for licensure in California. Dr. Welsh has published articles related to cross-cultural mental health, institutional factors that influence violence, and trauma. Her clinical interests include CBT, DBT, Prevention, and Cross-Cultural Issues.

Approach to Supervision:

“My approach to supervision is to provide a safe space for the trainee to explore their approach to clinical work, specific cases, and life-work balance. I hope to strike a balance between developing individualized and creative approaches to working with clients, while maintaining a high standard of competence and empirically-driven clinical care and assessment. I hope to provide mentorship in a holistic fashion and to foster a sense of continual learning and enthusiasm for work that we do. I am grateful for the opportunity to work with trainees as I find that it continually reminds me why I became a psychologist and encourages me to continue to learn and develop as a professional.”

 

Mark A. Williams, Ph.D.Mark A. Williams

Biography:

Dr. Williams received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 2005. His research interests include the neurocognitive sequelae of psychiatric disorders as well as chronic medical conditions. He has published on the neurocognitive effects of hemodialysis and end-stage renal failure. Dr. Williams completed his internship in the Clinical Neuropsychology Track at DSH - Patton. He went on to complete a postdoctoral fellowship in Neuropsychology at DSH - Patton. The following year Dr. Williams was hired as a staff psychologist and currently serves as the Director of Patton’s RISE program, which provides cognitive remediation and social cognition training to patients with low cognitive functioning. In addition to his work at DSH - Patton, Dr. Williams also serves as an adjunct instructor with California State University at Pomona, where he teaches courses in the areas of Brain and Behavior, Multicultural Psychology, and Abnormal Psychology.

Approach to Supervision:

“Working with interns is one of the most stimulating and rewarding aspects of my job. I enjoy engaging with trainees in a collaborative manner that allows for a transition from academic to applied application of their clinical knowledge and skill. My goal is to help individuals build upon their unique strengths and skill sets. My approach to supervision is to provide a supportive structure in which the intern is comfortable with developing his or her professional autonomy. I encourage supervisees to approach their clinical work from a hypothesis testing perspective to aid and guide their therapeutic interactions and assessments.”

Julie Yang, Psy.D.

Biography:

Dr. Yang received her doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology, with an emphasis in Health Psychology from Alliant International University, Fresno. She completed her clinical internship at DSH-Patton and went on to complete advance training in forensics through the post-doctoral fellowship at DSH-Patton. Presently, Dr. Yang is holding a position as a staff psychologist at DSH-Patton. She was formerly an adjunct professor at Loma Linda University where she taught classes in the area of personality assessment. Dr. Yang also formerly held a position as a forensic clinician treating and evaluating high risk sex offender parolees in the community. Additionally, she has experience with evaluating juvenile offenders, including juvenile sex offenders, for dispositional hearings. At present, her clinical and forensic work encompasses the treatment and assessment of adults with severe mental disorders of various legal commitment types, court testimony, and supervision of trainees among other related duties.

Approach to Supervision:

“I find the supervision process to be an enriching relationship in which learning takes place in both the supervisor and the supervisee. My approach to supervision is to establish an environment that encourages growth and development through an educative and supportive process. I encourage my trainees to explore new challenges and interests. I hope to assist trainees to develop their professional independence by fostering their strengths and encouraging them to assert their knowledge and skills.”